Yatchan Movie Review

After Arindhum Ariyamalum and Pattiyal, Vishnuvardhan’s style of filmmaking went through a makeover, moving onto stylish thrillers which did not compromise on the substance. Today, there exists a section of the audience who still relish the flavour of those two films, thereby wishing that the director would come back someday with a film of that sort. UTV’s latest release Yatchan, does just that. Let’s stop the comparisons right here.

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For starters, Yatchan is a short-story-turned-feature-film. From the pages of the prestigious Ananda Vikatan, writers Subha and Vishnuvardhan have bloated up this 2-odd hour entertainer which boasts of a dozen characters knitted together by events based on the chaos theory. Directors usually tend to slip a bit when the story flows through a lot of people, but Vishnuvardhan is quite clear on that front. Right from the start, he keeps the narration at control, offering no room for confusions to fly in. The contrasting colour tones maintained for both the lead characters presents the film through a new eye, with both entertainment and the plot being served on the same leaf. Though the story takes a while to start, it springs up towards the interval and takes a diversion from thereon.

In terms of script selection, Yatchan might be one of Arya’s best among his last five. His tanned facials and dishevelled hairdo easily remind you of his ‘Kutty’ looks at the early stages of his career. As he plays a die-hard fan of Thala Ajith in the film, it draws a ton of references (thankfully with good reasoning) to the actor with SJ Suryah’s cameo being the highlight. Kreshna on the other hand takes it by the horns, making use of the opportunity to bring out his talents. Gifted with a handful of good moments over the runtime, he comes to the party with a fair show. Kudos to both the female artists, as they add a lot of colour and zeal to the film. While Deepa Sannidhi (the fulcrum of the film) underplays her role with maturity, Swati sprays her energy and wittiness all over the screen. The responsibility of the laughs have been handed over to Thambi Ramaih in the first half and RJ Balaji in the second – both coming up with a countable amount of wisecracks. The weak links are definitely Adil Hussain as the forgettable villain, and Ponvannan who gets reduced to less than what he is capable of.

Yuvan Shankar Raja does a great job on the music with some memorable tunes and likable background cues. Om Prakash’s visuals do the trick with a special mention to the colouring and the interval block. Technically, the film sits on a tower.

Yet, Yatchan doesn’t convince you completely. One of the first things that will pop up in your head is the weight that the script possesses. At some places in the film, the screenplay feels stretched in the process of turning creative ideas into narrative ideas. It also suffers from the intertwining of an appreciable scene followed by a squirmy snippet. You cannot help but ask for more excitement and grip in the proceedings.

At the end of it all, Yatchan works as time-pass material. Traversing in a non-serious route, the film flows through a huge cast, providing some fun on the way. Take it at the surface, and this might quench your thirst.

Verdict: Jolly good fun.

2.75 / 5 

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